Morton's neuroma steroid injection success rate

Anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve can lead to the development of a neuroma. One of the most common offenders is wearing shoes that have a tapered toe box or high-heeled shoes that cause the toes to be forced into the toe box. People with certain foot deformities—bunions, hammertoes, flatfeet or more flexible feet—are at higher risk for developing a neuroma. Other potential causes are activities that involve repetitive irritation to the ball of the foot, such as running or court sports. An injury or other type of trauma to the area may also lead to a neuroma.

“ I have experienced symptoms of a Mortons for several years, and i think it started after wearing a particular pair of football boots through most of a season. Fortunately i recognised the symptoms early on and made an effort to avoid any shoe that was likely to trigger it off. I get twinges maybe every few months or so but it doesn’t stop me from doing anything. I am certainly not a candidate for surgery and haven’t felt the need to ask any of my colleagues to inject it with a steroid yet, but i do remember last year when skiing i was stood in a queue wearing ski boots for over half an hour, it got worse the longer i stood until i was grimacing quite visibly. .if i had some steroid and local anaesthetic with me at the time i would have injected it myself ! ”

A retrospective study of 67 patients in whom Morton's neuroma had been diagnosed showed that 78% were women. The average age was 58 years (range, 19-85 years). Pain in the forefoot, which worsened with walking, was relieved by removal of shoes. The presence of local interdigital tenderness led to the diagnosis. Modification of shoes was helpful in two patients. The other 65 patients received a series of interdigital Xylocaine-steroid injections at one- to three-week intervals, which immediately relieved the pain in 30% of the patients and gave partial relief in 50%. At a two-year follow-up examination, 80% of the patients indicated complete relief of pain or had only slight pain. Surgical excision was indicated in those who failed to respond to the injections. Of 11 patients, surgical excision successfully relieved pain in four, effected partial relief in four, and failed in three. As a result of this retrospective study of patients with Morton's neuroma, the authors recommend therapeutic injections prior to surgery.

It almost sounds exactly like how I describe my pai. I have had 2 neuroma surgeries , 2 tarsal tunnel release and a bunionectomy . Also they had moved my little toe over from overcrowding. I still am in a lot of pain and have started seeing a pain mgmt doctor. Recently had a emg on my foot and he said no periphreal neuropathy present. My pm says he thinks I have a small fibrous nerve that cannot be detected with a emg. I am having mri done on my brain , neck , back , and foot to rule out other causes for pain. My pain mgmt doctor explained it would be a waste of time for another  surgery because at this point I have scar tissue and it is very hard to find a neuroma especially with the scar tissue. He said he believes I have crps /rsd. I had never heard of it till I went to him. He has me on gabapentin x 3 , tylenol 3 with codien as needed and meloxicam. Considering an implant unit to control pain. I commented on yours because I have the exact same symptoms especailly feeling like I stepped on glass , cant wear socks , foot feeling like it is being crushed or squeezed to death. I cant walk barefooted and my feet swell. Check out the info on crps. I think will explain a lot to you. Good luck. 

Morton's neuroma steroid injection success rate

morton's neuroma steroid injection success rate

It almost sounds exactly like how I describe my pai. I have had 2 neuroma surgeries , 2 tarsal tunnel release and a bunionectomy . Also they had moved my little toe over from overcrowding. I still am in a lot of pain and have started seeing a pain mgmt doctor. Recently had a emg on my foot and he said no periphreal neuropathy present. My pm says he thinks I have a small fibrous nerve that cannot be detected with a emg. I am having mri done on my brain , neck , back , and foot to rule out other causes for pain. My pain mgmt doctor explained it would be a waste of time for another  surgery because at this point I have scar tissue and it is very hard to find a neuroma especially with the scar tissue. He said he believes I have crps /rsd. I had never heard of it till I went to him. He has me on gabapentin x 3 , tylenol 3 with codien as needed and meloxicam. Considering an implant unit to control pain. I commented on yours because I have the exact same symptoms especailly feeling like I stepped on glass , cant wear socks , foot feeling like it is being crushed or squeezed to death. I cant walk barefooted and my feet swell. Check out the info on crps. I think will explain a lot to you. Good luck. 

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